The Vicks®
Moisture Map

Your Home

Click on the circle for a fact about your home!

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Fact:
Studies have shown that the influenza virus can live longer on non-porous surfaces like stainless steel and plastic versus porous surfaces like fabric, tissues, etc.
(Sources: City-Data, Weather.com, LiveScience)
Fact:
Too much humidity in a home means you will start to notice condensation on windows, wet stains on walls and ceilings, possible mold growth, and musty smells.
(Sources: City-Data, Weather.com, LiveScience)
Fact:
Indoor heating systems significantly reduce relative humidity levels in a home, office, or school by increasing the temperature of already dry air, thus lowering the relative humidity.

Forced air heating systems provide more rapid mixing of indoor air throughout a residence – and thus reduce relative humidity levels quicker – than radiant heating.
(Sources: City-Data, Weather.com, LiveScience)
Fact:
A recent study shows that when homes are kept at the optimal 40-60% relative humidity level, influenza virus survival in the air can be potentially decreased.

It is particularly important to run a humidifier during the winter months when air tends to be colder and drier where relative humidity levels can reach as low as 10%.
(Sources: City-Data, Weather.com, LiveScience)
Fact:
Using a humidifier is a great way to promote the health of your house plants by helping to prevent curled leaves and dry leaf tips.
(Sources: City-Data, Weather.com, LiveScience)
Fact:
The difference between cool-mist and warm-mist is primarily a matter of personal preference - just as some people prefer to sleep with extra blankets and others prefer none at all.
(Sources: City-Data, Weather.com, LiveScience)
Fact:
During the winter, humidity levels can drop as low as 10%. When humidity levels are this low, moisture is pulled from the wood furniture, antiques and even your piano.

The moisture humidifiers add to dry air help to alleviate common nuisances brought on by winter heating, such as static electricity, peeling wallpaper, and cracks in paint and furniture.
(Sources: City-Data, Weather.com, LiveScience)